Health benefits

Electrified homes are healthier homes

Gas appliances are commonplace in many homes for space and water heating, laundry drying, and cooking. However, studies have shown that exposure to the air pollutants they produce pose significant health risks, especially for gas stoves, which we have the greatest exposure to. An all-electric home eliminates these risks and can provide a safer and healthier living environment for you and your family.

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Red or orange gas flames indicate incomplete combustion and higher concentrations of carbon monoxide. It can be harmful when inhaled as it reduces the amount of oxygen that the body can absorb.

Particulate Matter (PM 2.5)

Particulate Matter (PM 2.5)

Particulate matter, also known as PM, is a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. It is a byproduct produced from cooking, especially at high heat. Burning gas when cooking can cause respiratory and cardiovascular problems when inhaled.

Nitrogen Oxides (NOx)

Nitrogen Oxides (NOx)

Nitrogen oxides are a group of gasses produced by the burning of natural gas (primarily methane). They can cause respiratory issues and aggravate conditions such as asthma.

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde is a chemical commonly used in building materials and household products. It is also produced by the burning of gas and can be harmful when inhaled as it can irritate the eyes, nose, and throat, and can also lead to cancer.

Extreme Heat

Extreme Heat

Extreme heat in kitchens can lead to a variety of negative effects such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and other heat-related illnesses, especially for vulnerable populations such as the sick or elderly or people who experience frequent exposure like restaurant chefs.

Benzene

Benzene

Benzene is a highly flammable and colorless liquid that is found in residential gas with concentrations varying by region. It is part of the class of chemicals known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and evaporates into the air quickly. It is harmful to human health due to its carcinogenic properties, which can cause leukemia and other forms of cancer.

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Red or orange gas flames indicate incomplete combustion and higher concentrations of carbon monoxide. It can be harmful when inhaled as it reduces the amount of oxygen that the body can absorb.

Solutions for healthier indoor air

Healthy indoor air, free of harmful pollutants, should be commonplace for everyone. If you have gas appliances, there are still many ways to reduce exposure to air pollutants in your home

Ensure appliances are vented properly

Ventilation, when used correctly, can move some of the harmful air pollutants from gas appliances and other sources out of the air you breathe, but it’s not always a perfect solution. Gas appliances like laundry dryers, furnaces, and water heaters are typically vented outdoors when installed. It’s important to ensure these outdoor vents are intact as the appliance ages to avoid pollutants, like carbon monoxide, from sneaking into your home.

Use your kitchen ventilation

Using ventilation above your stove is critical to reducing exposure to harmful pollutants, especially if you have a gas stove. Kitchen vent fans that move air outside the home are the most effective at reducing exposure. Some vent fans recirculate air back into the kitchen after pushing it through a filter that removes particulate matter but not other pollutants. To help your fan capture pollutants, prioritize cooking on the back burners. Turn on the fan a few minutes before you cook and keep it on for a few minutes after.

Electrify gas appliances

The best way to eliminate exposure to gas pollutants in a home is to remove the source altogether. Upgrading to energy efficient, all-electric appliances is a great way to do so.

All-electric homes are an equitable need

Though anyone with gas in their home is susceptible to air pollutant exposure, some communities face increased burden and are less able to seek solutions.